Homemade Bone Broth [crockpot]

bone broth

So what’s all the fuss about bone broth anyways? And what is bone broth in the first place? Bone broth is pretty much what it sounds like. A broth made from bones. Bones are typically simmered for long periods of time [12-24+ hours] with some vegetables and spices to give it added flavor. The long cooking time allows for many minerals + nutrients to leach out of the bones. These minerals + nutrients can be extremely healing and nourishing for the body.

While making bone broth takes time, it’s also fairly effortless. If you chose to make bone broth in a crockpot like I do, the crockpot does all the work for you. You just add your ingredients [recipe below], set to low, set your timer and let it works its magic. It’s just too easy.

Let’s check out the many benefits of bone broth.

[1] nutrient rich.

Bone broths are extremely rich in nutrients such as a variety of minerals [calcium, magnesium, phosphorus + other trace minerals], amino acids [protein building blocks], collagen + glucosamine. During the cooking process, and with the addition of raw apple cider vinegar [acid], the minerals leach out of the bones and into the cooking water, thus making nutrient-rich bone broth. These minerals are very easily absorbed and used by the body which is one of the reasons why bone broth gets such praise.

[2] gut healing.

The gelatin from bone broth helps seal + protect a leaky gut which is a common condition I see among clients. Leaky gut [or gut permeability] can be caused by many things including: a poor diet, stress, toxins + inflammation. And with leaky gut usually comes food sensitivities, which can leave people with the following symptoms: [1] fatigue [2] brain fog + lack of concentration [3] poor digestion, diarrhea + constipation [4] overall feeling of malaise + frustration. Gelatin can help seal holes present in your intestinal lining and aid in the healing process. But not only is bone broth beneficial for people with leaky guts, it can help protect your overall gut lining, thus helping prevent future issues.

[3] enhances digestion.

Bone broth is another one of those “superfoods” that people are talking about, especially in the holistic health community. The gut plays a major role in overall health. It houses over 70% of our immune system helping to defend our bodies from sickness, it communicates with the brain and other organs, and it digests the nutrients we eat in order to build a healthy body. So if our gut isn’t functioning optimally, then the rest our body won’t be able to either. The nutrients + minerals from bone broth are also very easily digested, even for many people with food sensitivities, IBS or celiac disease. And the gelatin present in bone broth as noted above is great for gut healing and decreasing inflammation, so the nutrients you eat can be readily absorbed and used.

bone broth

[4] anti-aging.

Bone broth is a rich source of collagen. Collagen helps improve skin elasticity + vibrance, and helps enhance the health and strength of your hair and nails. So instead of putting creams and lotions on your face to help with fine lines + wrinkles, add some homemade bone broth to your diet instead. It’s a lot safer, and a lot cheaper.

[5] joint support.

Bone broth contains glucosamine + chondroitin which have long been known to help strengthen and possibly decrease deterioration + inflammation in the joints. And the gelatin helps support your connective tissue [i.e. ligaments]. So instead of taking expensive glucosamine supplements, make homemade bone broth a part of your regular diet for joint support.

[6] inexpensive.

Bone broth is so simple to make at home and can be very inexpensive. Bones are typically fairly cheap to purchase, but I find the best way to obtain bones is from a whole chicken that you roast for the meat and then save the bones for broth. In addition to bones, the other ingredients include water, apple cider vinegar, veggies [onion, garlic, carrot, celery], sea salt + peppercorns.

[flavoring agents.]

bone broth ingredients

Kitchen tools you’ll need.

[1] large crockpot or stock pot

[2] fine mesh strainer

[3] storage containers [i.e. mason jars]

 [all ingredients to the crockpot; just add water.]

bone broth ingredients2

What to do with bone broth.

You can use bone broth just like you would any other stocks or broths. Some suggestions include:

[1] add to soups/stews

[2] sauté with veggies

[3] as liquid for cooking whole grains like rice or quinoa

[4] add to a mug and sip on

[store in mason jars.]

bone broth3

Storing bone broth.

You can use your bone broth immediately or if you want to save it for later, add to mason jars and store in the fridge for up to one week, or freeze for a couple of months. If you decide to freeze your broth for later, leave at least an inch of space at the top of the mason jar so the broth has room to expand. This will prevent the broth from over-expanding and cracking your jars.

Homemade Bone Broth [crockpot]

servings: about 8 cups

 Ingredients

  • 1 – 1.5 pounds of chicken bones [I used the bones from a whole chicken that I roasted earlier in the week]
  • 1 small onion, peeled and roughly chopped
  • 2-3 carrots, chopped coarsely
  • 2 stalks celery, chopped coarsely
  • 2 tsp sea salt
  • ½ teaspoon peppercorns
  • 1 Tbsp raw, unrefined apple cider vinegar [I use Bragg’s® brand]
  • water to cover bones + veggies completely

Directions

Add all ingredients to a crockpot set to low. Cover and cook for 12-24 hours. I usually do about 18 hours. Using a fine mesh strainer, pour broth, bones, veggies + peppercorns into strainer – catching the broth in a large bowl. Use broth immediately or store in air tight mason jars. Will stay for one week in refrigerator, or you can freeze. If freezing, leave 1-2 inches of room at the top of your mason jar because the broth will expand when frozen. Use in soups, stir-frys or just sip on a cup of broth.

bone broth2

Homemade Bone Broth [crockpot]
 
Cook time
Total time
 
Author:
Serves: about 8 cups
Ingredients
  • 1 – 1.5 pounds of chicken bones [I used the bones from a whole chicken that I roasted earlier in the week]
  • 1 small onion, peeled and roughly chopped
  • 2-3 carrots, chopped coarsely
  • 2 stalks celery, chopped coarsely
  • 2 tsp sea salt
  • ½ teaspoon peppercorns
  • 1 Tbsp raw, unrefined apple cider vinegar [I use Bragg's® brand]
  • water to cover bones + veggies completely
Instructions
  1. Add all ingredients to a crockpot set to low.
  2. Cover and cook for 12-24 hours. I usually do about 18 hours.
  3. Using a fine mesh strainer, pour broth, bones, veggies + peppercorns into strainer - catching the broth in a large bowl.
  4. Use broth immediately or store in air tight mason jars.
  5. Will stay for 1 week in refrigerator, or you can freeze.
  6. If freezing, leave 1-2 inches of room at the top of your mason jar because the broth will expand when frozen.
  7. Use in soups, stir-frys or just sip on a cup of broth.

Have you tried making homemade bone broth? Let me know in the comments below!

 

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Angela Freed

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